Simple Breakfast, Simply Fun

Since today is a busy day – packing for a short retreat, plus hoping to get to a local Columbus Day festival (Italian food- my favorite!) – I’m posting early, hoping to get another one in later tonight. My goal for this new blog is to provide at least two recipes, or at least two food-related writings, per week. I won’t have wi-fi access for a few days, so this is where the week’s writing promise gets fulfilled. With any luck and a burst of energy, I might even get a bonus post in later tonight.

Breakfast. Love it. When I was a kid, manufacturers of Wheaties called their product “The Breakfast of Champions,” which of course made every google-eyed t.v. freak under 10 years old hound Mom into a trip to the A&P or Grand Union to buy a box. The power of commericials. Obviously the Wheaties folk were profit-oriented, but perhaps they did encourage children to munch on something other than what they might find in the cookie jar while their parents still snoozed in their bed (or beds— also according to television, couples did not share the same sleeping vehicle in those days!). And Wheaties, still around today, beats the bygosh out of those sugar-sopped cereals that line grocery store aisles. Still, when we can come up with a morning food that entices kids to the breakfast table, it’s a plus.

Egg-in-a-Nest might be that “plus.” It’s just plain fun. And easy to prepare. When I made it for Bill and me, he got a kick out of it. We’re big kids ourselves, Inner Child plastered all over Outer Adult.

It’s just possible that lots of readers have made the following recipe for their kids or grandkids, or that they’ve seen it somewhere but never got around to making it. I’d probably heard of it but it got buried beneath other mind-foggers until I came across it in The Amish Cook: Recollections and Recipes from an Old Order Amish Family by Elizabeth Coblentz with Kevin Williams (Ten Speed Press, 2002). I’ve long been intrigued by the Amish and their simple life, having read Sue Bender’s Plain and Simple: A Woman’s Journey to the Amish (HarperSanFrancisco, 1989) years ago, and so I bought Coblentz’s cookbook. Not only does it contain some terrific, down-to-earth recipes, the photographs of Amish country make it a treasure. Years later, there’s now a follow-up volume penned by one of the author’s daughters who took on the mantle of The Amish Cook after her mother passed away. Perhaps I’ll purchase that one someday too, if I can make room for it amongst my 300+ other cookbooks!

I’ve added two related websites about The Amish Cook to my Favorites list on the laptop: http://www.oasisnewsfeatures.com and http://record-eagle.com/amishcook. The latter site is where you might subscribe to the current Cook’s still-popular column.

And now for the recipe. Of course I’ve added my own twist, but it’s so simple there’s not much to twist!

EGG-IN-A-NEST BREAKFAST (Individual Serving)

Ingredients

  • 1 piece rye bread, or another type bread of choice
  • 2 tbsp. butter
  • 1 egg
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Preparation

 Using the top of a drinking glass, cut a circle in the middle of the bread. Reserve the cut-out circle.

Butter both the top of the bread with the hole in it and the circle cut-out, using one tablespoon of the butter. Melt the other tablespoon of butter in a small, nonstick skillet on medium heat.

Place both the bread-with-hole and the circle cut-out in the pan, UNbuttered side down. Lightly toast both. Remove the bread-with-hole to a plate, and turn over the circle to brown on its buttered side, removing it to the plate when it’s toasted (both sides will now be toasted).

Return the bread-with-hole to the skillet, placing it butterside-down. Let it fry for a few seconds; then break an egg into the hole. Salt and pepper egg to taste.

Fry egg until you are certain you can turn both the bread around (about a minute to minute-and-a-half).

Flip bread and egg over and continue to cook until egg is to desired doneness (I prefer mine over-easy).

Preparation

Using the top of a drinking glass, cut a circle in the middle of the bread. Reserve the cut-out circle.

Butter both the top of the bread with the hole in it and the circle cut-out, using one tablespoon of the butter. Melt the other tablespoon of butter in a small, nonstick skillet on medium heat.

Place both the bread-with-hole and the circle cut-out in the pan, UNbuttered side down. Lightly toast both. Remove the bread-with-hole to a plate, and turn over the circle to brown on its buttered side, removing it to the plate when it’s toasted (both sides will now be toasted).

A favorite pasttime- reading while eating at our Shaker (not Amish!) style table.

Return the bread-with-hole to the skillet, placing it butterside-down. Let it fry for a few seconds; then break an egg into the hole. Salt and pepper egg to taste.

Fry egg until you are certain you can turn both the bread around (about a minute to minute-and-a-half).

Flip bread and egg over and continue to cook until egg is to desired doneness (I prefer mine over-easy).

Remove egg-in-nest to plate, along with previously toasted circle cut-out, and feast! Especially good served along with a fruit side dish or garden-fresh sliced tomatoes with basil. 

 

Obviously, you can increase this recipe for more than one person but, if you find yourself enjoying a quiet morning alone, prop a good book in front of your plate and savor both story and simple deliciousness!

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